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News

Students support local organizations to improve equity

Aug 28, 2020
One element of the struggle for economic equity in Black, Indigenous, and other People of Color (BIPOC) communities is the intentional denial of support networks that provide funding, customers, connections or other resources for businesses and...
News

Ivacko discusses opioid interventions on Michigan Radio

May 14, 2019
Tom Ivacko, associate director of the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy (CLOSUP), housed at the Ford School, talks about Michigan’s relationship to the opioid crisis with Michigan Radio’s Paulette Parker. Published May 13, 2019 online, with...
News

CLOSUP report: Michigan officials report housing shortages

Jun 22, 2018
Many local governments in Michigan feel they have a shortage of housing in their counties and cities, according to a survey from University of Michigan researchers. About 40 percent of local officials say they have too little single family housing...
CLOSUP Lecture Series

Working Together to Achieve Detroit’s Future

Oct 31, 2018, 2:30-3:50 pm EDT
Weill Hall, Annenberg Auditorium (1120)
The Ford School’s Michigan Politics and Policy class (PubPol 475/750) will be joined by Chase Cantrell, Executive Director and Founder of Building Community Value for a discussion about the future of Detroit on Weds Oct 31, 2:30pm. We have moved this class session to the larger Ford School Annenberg Auditorium (1120) so this lecture can be open to the public -- we hope to see you there!
Ford School
CLOSUP Lecture Series

The U.S. Energy Transition and Vulnerable Populations

Mar 7, 2018, 11:30 am-1:00 pm EST
Weill Hall, Betty Ford Classroom (1110)
The U.S. is in the midst of an energy transition. This path toward decarbonization of the energy sector promises many societal benefits such as reduced greenhouse gas emissions, technological innovation, and reduced air pollution. The costs of this transition such as price spikes or job displacement, however, are not evenly spread across the population, since some individuals and communities are more vulnerable to the adverse impacts than others. In this presentation, I will introduce a framework for conceptualizing vulnerability and then provide an illustration of its potential application using the case of the renewable portfolio standard. I will also present findings from interviews and focus groups with individuals that reside or work within more vulnerable populations. These findings provide insights about the manner in which communities perceive of the energy transition, and how they cope with changes introduced by the transition.
Ford School
CLOSUP Lecture Series

Marijuana Policy in the U.S.: From the War on Drugs to Rapid Reform

Sep 26, 2016, 4:00-5:30 pm EDT
Weill Hall, Betty Ford Classroom (1110)
In a new book, Marijuana: A Short History, the Brookings Institution’s John Hudak profiles how policy has evolved; how factors like economics, racism, politics, and public opinion have shaped policy, and what the future of marijuana policy may hold.
CLOSUP Lecture Series

Gender and the STEM Trajectory: Evidence from the NLSY97

Apr 25, 2012, 8:30-10:00 am EDT
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy 3rd Floor Seminar Room
CIERS: Causal inference in Education research seminar CIERS Mission: The objective of the Causal Inference in Education Research Seminar (CIERS) is to engage students and faculty from across the university in conversations around education research using various research methodies. This seminar provides a space for doctoral students and faculty from the School of Education, Ford School of Public Policy, and the Departments of Economics, Sociology, Statistics, and Political Science to discuss current research and receive feedback on works-in-progress.
Ford School
CLOSUP Lecture Series

For-Profit Colleges: Education or Exploitation?

Nov 18, 2010, 4:30-6:00 pm EST
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
For-profit colleges are under fire. Critics point to students' low earnings and high debt loads as evidence that these schools do not provide a quality education. Defenders of the sector note that the schools serve a population of low-skilled, low-income students that traditional colleges ignore. Congress is now considering legislation that would bar from the federal aid programs any schools whose graduates' earnings fall below a minimum threshold.
Ford School
CLOSUP Lecture Series

Mortgage Credit and Racial Segregation

Nov 1, 2010, 11:30 am-1:00 pm EDT
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Abstract: This paper shows that the mortgage credit boom has significantly affected urban and school racial segregation from 1995 to 2007. We develop a model of urban segregation with credit constraints that shows that easier credit can either increase or decrease segregation, depending on the race of the marginal consumer who benefits from the expansion of credit. We then use school demographics from 1995 to 2007, matched to a national comprehensive dataset of mortgage originations, to document the link between credit supply and schools' racial demographics.
Ford School

CLOSUP Seminars: The Effect of School Choice on College and Crime

Mar 11, 2009, 12:00-1:00 pm EDT
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
David Deming will present his study of the implementation of an open enrollment public school choice plan in Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district (CMS) in 2002. Students were guaranteed admission to their home school but could apply to as many as 3 other public schools in the district. Where demand for slots exceeded supply, assignment was determined by randomized lottery. Deming finds significant benefits of school choice for students who come from neighborhoods that are assigned to very low performing schools.

A Pathway to Common Education Standards

Jan 26, 2009, 4:00-5:30 pm EST
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
Abstract The case for a national effort to create core standards grows stronger by the day. Currently, 50 states have 50 standards, and most states are setting the bar as low as possible in order to comply with the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements of NCLB. Half the states have set fourth-grade reading benchmarks so low that they fall beneath even the most basic level on the National Assessment of Educational Progress.